Simon, Seymour

Seymour Simon has been honored with many awards for his work, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science/Subaru Lifetime Achievement Award for his lasting contribution to children’s science literature; the New York State Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature; the Hope S. Dean Memorial Award from the Boston Public Library for his contribution to children’s science literature; The Washington Post/Children’s Book Guild Award for Nonfiction; the Jeremiah Ludington Award for his outstanding contribution to children’s nonfiction; the Empire State Award for excellence in literature for young people; and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Forum on Children’s Science Books. His website, SeymourSimon.com, is a Webby Award honoree and was named one of twelve “2012 Great Websites for Kids” by the American Library Association. More than seventy-five of Seymour Simon’s books have been named Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA).

Seymour Simon (@SeymourSimon), whom the New York Times called “the dean of the [children’s science] field,” is the author of over 300 highly acclaimed science books, more than seventy-five of which have been named Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). He has introduced tens of millions of children to a staggering array of subjects, and says: “I’m more interested in arousing enthusiasm in kids than I am in teaching the facts. The facts may change, but that enthusiasm for exploring the world will remain with them for the rest of their lives.”

3 Fun Facts

1. Seymour Simon’s Einstein Anderson science mysteries are based on puzzles he used to do with his middle school students; whoever figured it out would be dubbed “Einstein for a Day.”
2. While in high school, Seymour was a member of the Junior Astronomy Club at the American Museum of Natural History, where he ground a mirror to make his own telescope.
3. One of Seymour Simon’s earliest books is dedicated to his wife, “as partial repayment for the ants in the refrigerator” (for a science project, of course!)